There’s more to running safety than using the correct shoes and stretches. Follow these safety rules below are key to being smart and safe on the open road.

  1. Remember: headphones can be dangerous.
    As much as everyone wants to hear music, it drowns out sounds such as a horn honking, footsteps behind you, or someone calling out to you. Instead, try running with a friend and have a conversation. Or try playing music out of your smart phone speaker instead of using the headphones. Be aware and extra-alert if you do choose to listen to music with headphones.
     
  2. Run against traffic.
    Run or walk against the traffic. You want to face the cars and/or bikes so they see you. Make sure when cars are making a right turn, they see you. Many cars only look left when entering into oncoming traffic. Be vocal and yell.
     
  3. If you run at night, make yourself visible.
    Wear light-colored clothing and invest in a reflective vest and headlamps. Not only should you make yourself visible, but you want to be able to see things (potholes, animals, people) on the road as well.
     
  4. Don't assume a car will stop for you.
    If you and a car are both approaching an intersection, stop and let the car go first or make eye contact with the driver and communicate who will go first.
     
  5. Run with others.
    Running with a group or even one person is safer than going alone. Strength in numbers.
     
  6. Avoid trails and empty roads when you are alone.
    Find a well-lit area to run in where there are cars and people who go by frequently. Go with your gut: if the area feels unsafe and too quiet, get out of there.
     
  7. Carry ID.
    Carry identification, or purchase a road-ID. This is an ID you wear on your wrist, ankle, or shoe. You can include your name, emergency contact information, blood type, and any allergies. This has saved many lives.
     
  8. Carry pepper spray.
    The Army/Navy store sells a hand-held pepper spray that is “at the ready” when you need it.
     
  9. Don’t give directions to strangers in cars if you are running alone.
Medical Disclaimer:
Please consult your doctor with any medical issues before beginning a training program. The contents in this guide are for informational purposes only, and are not intended to diagnose any medical condition, replace the advice of a healthcare professional, or provide any medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
Anna D'Anna photo & logo
Anna D’Anna is a personal trainer who takes a personal interest in the success others pursue toward athletic goals. Twenty-four years ago she left a successful career on Wall Street to pursue her true passion – and she’s never looked back. She readily shares her knowledge and experience to inspire others – whether they are seeking a more active lifestyle, or training competitively.
She began teaching Spin classes (and quickly gained a following of cyclists) nearly 20 years ago after being certified by Johnny G’s premier Master Presenter Josh Taylor.  As a personal trainer and group fitness professional, she is certified by ACE and AFAA – nationally accredited certifying agencies committed to delivering science-based health and fitness instruction. Anna is also certified Heart Zones Level III instructor. Beneficial to both those who seek her out in fitness classes and those she trains individually, Anna is also certified in Watts training, TRX, and CPR. Additionally, Anna is a USAT certified triathlon coach and race director.  Anna has been quoted in Runner's World magazine and referenced in “Ultimate Fitness: The Quest for Truth about Health and Exercise.”  In 2007 Anna co-founded a regional women’s training community that emphasizes shared experiences and fosters a culture of camaraderie and support.
In her personal time, Anna is an avid road cyclist and has recently challenged herself to mountain biking. Anna has completed five marathons (three in NYC, her hometown) and hopes to qualify to run the Boston Marathon one day. She volunteers her time and energy for numerous community organizations and enjoys cheering others on at races, rides, and triathlons. She resides in NJ with husband, Todd, and their rescue-lab, Jax.