Rick Werner
By
Rick Werner

Together, we are stronger than addiction.

taton moise
By
Jessie Dunleavy

Loving a person who suffers from addiction is its own kind of teacher.

Taylor and Bryanna, in white dresses, posing for a photo

Beginning at age 15, Bryanna Thomas struggled with alcohol and other drugs. But today, she’s thriving in recovery.

Capitol Hill with flag

Thanks to thousands of passionate advocates, we’ve made a lot of progress so far in 2019. Here’s what we’ve achieved together.

A hand lifting a Pride flag toward the sky. Image courtesy of Yannis Papanastasopoulos
By
Jess Keefe

LGBTQ+ Americans are more at risk for substance use disorders. 

A beach ball floating in a pool
By
Anne De Santis Lopez

Here's how to protect your wellness while still making the most of your summer social events.

Image of newspaper boxes on a street curbside

The downsides of federal grants for opioids, a national survey on LGBTQ+ youth and mental health, and more.

A set of hands holding a newspaper, with the headline "Changing the Narrative"

Addiction is complicated, and so is the media coverage that comes along with it.

The author in front of her car, which features a Princess Leia tire cover
By
Sarah Bowen

I called one of my remaining friends and said, “Help me, Helen. You’re my only hope.”

Image of newspapers stacked

Fighting fentanyl, Biden's history of Drug War policies, and a new generation of doctors trained to treat addiction.

Dry in July Mocktail

You don't have to give up the craft cocktail experience just because you're not drinking alcohol.

Angela-Shatterproof-blog
By
Lena Camilletti

“Your sister is sick, and she has to go away for a few weeks to get better."

Two women watch the sunset on a beach
By
Rosemary Blackburn

I hope the moms of addicted children everywhere know that they are not alone.

Sam Arsenault in the studio at NPR

Yesterday on NPR’s 1A, Shatterproof’s Sam Arsenault talked about why residential rehab isn't usually the best choice.

A childhood photo of the author and her brother
By
Jaclyn Brown

Addiction was like a roller coaster ride none of us wanted to be on—very few high points and an overwhelming amount of lows.